Articles Posted in NYLL

Published on:

By Bobbie M. James

According to the ILO, “Americans work 137 more hours per year than Japanese workers, 260 more hours per year than British workers, and 499 more hours per year than French workers.” Employees working long hours can experience numerous mental, physical and social effects. With the private sector showing no sign of reducing the work hours of its employees on its own and technology making it easier than ever to reach anyone anywhere at any time, it is no surprise that policymakers are seeking to improve work-life balance through legislation.  Countries such as Germany, Italy, and, most recently, France and the Philippines, have enacted “right-to-disconnect” policies, which prohibit contacting employees during non-work hours.  Now, the so-called “Do-Not-Disturb” movement is spreading across North America to Canada and the United States.

In March of 2018, New York City Council members introduced a proposed law prohibiting private employers with more than 10 employees from requiring their employees to check and respond to their work emails, or any other work-related communications, during non-work hours. Two exceptions to this proposed rule are employees working overtime and emergency matters.  Employers who break this law would be subject to fines of $250 per violation.  As of January 17, 2019, the law is currently with the Committee on Consumer Affairs and Business Licensing.

Published on:

Owen H. Laird, Esq.

Most employees who work in New York City are covered by the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”) – one of the most liberal employment statutes in the nation.  This means that employees in New York City are afforded more protection against workplace discrimination and harassment than those who work outside of the City.

At the same time, New York City has one of the highest immigrant populations in the country, and many of those immigrants own or operate businesses in the City.  These immigrant-owned businesses are integral to the fabric of the city, and range from restaurants and corner stores to law firms and tech companies to factories and warehouses.

Published on:

Owen H. Laird, Esq.

For New Yorkers, both the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and New York Labor Law provide employees with rights to a minimum wage and, in many cases, overtime pay. However, many workers in New York still do not receive the pay to which they are entitled; for instance, employers may under-report employees’ hours, improperly withhold wages or tips, or simply pay a wage lower than the State minimum.

However, many employees choose to let these violations go because they are “minimal.” An employer might underpay an employee for by a half hour for each pay period, a loss that might only amount to a few dollars a month. The employee could hesitate to pursue those lost wages, afraid of upsetting things at work or doubtful that they can find a lawyer to pursue a smaller case. Despite these potential concerns, employees who believe they are being illegally underpaid should not be afraid.

Contact Information